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News Links | June 13, 2017

June 13, 2017 by SBCTC Communications

System News | Opinion

Editorial: In teaching students, EvCC built a community

There were some hard feelings among neighbors when Everett voters directed the city school board in 1941 to turn the newly built Lincoln Elementary School over to what was then Everett Junior College. The fledgling post-secondary program had shared the school with elementary students at first, according to a recently published history of the college by author Tomas Gaskin, who taught history at Everett Community College for 37 years before his retirement, as The Herald’s Eric Stevick reported Friday. ... The neighborhood’s children would lose their school to the college kids, but fortunately for Everett and north Snohomish County during the past 75 years, voters saw the need for college programs in the city and understood the potential benefit not just for students but for a growing city’s culture, economy and community.
Everett Herald, June 13, 2017

State agencies prep for ‘unlikely’ government shutdown

State agencies are beginning to inform workers and contractors of what to expect if a partial shutdown of government occurs July 1. ... The State Board for Community and Technical Colleges decided campuses can stay open if they have a way to pay for it. Everett Community College intends to begin its summer session July 3. ... Edmonds Community College will start summer classes July 5 and keep paying non-instructional, permanent employees through the first three weeks of July.
Everett Herald, June 12, 2017

Beginning in fall, Olympic College will offer courses at Chief Kitsap Academy

Olympic College, which offers two- and four-year degrees at its campuses in Bremerton, Poulsbo and Shelton, will soon offer college courses on the Port Madison Indian Reservation. ... Under the agreement, OC classes are scheduled to begin this fall at Chief Kitsap Academy, a Tribal Compact School, with initial courses for graduating high school students and community members seeking continuing education.
Kitsap Daily News, June 12, 2017

Skagit Valley College to graduate first class in firefighter scholarship program

While other Skagit Valley College students were preparing for finals Wednesday, the students in the college's fire protection technology program were putting their training to the test, running through smoke and flames in a simulated house fire. On Thursday, 12 of the students who will graduate from the program will do so after having benefited from two-year, full-ride scholarships that required them to volunteer at local fire districts.
Skagit Valley Herald, June 11, 2017 

Big Bend student-athletes deliver 500 new books to North Elementary School

Big Bend Community College student-athletes stopped by North Elementary School Friday with a delivery of 500 new books. A group of Vikings men’s and women’s basketball players, as well as a couple baseball players, visited the Moses Lake school as part of the Disney “Magic of Storytelling” program.
iFiberOne News, June 10, 2017

Bates Technical College business programs earn industry accreditation

The Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) has awarded accreditation to four programs at Bates Technical College. The programs, which include Accounting, Administrative Medical Assistant, Administrative Office Assistant, and Marketing and Business Management, passed a rigorous accreditation process based on the Baldrige Education Criteria for Performance Excellence.
The Suburban Times, June 10, 2017

Inside Olympia

We take a tour through state political history with soon-to-be-retired State Community Colleges Director Marty Brown, who spent nearly four decades in leadership positions in the legislature, governor's office, and state government.
TVW, June 8, 2017

Trends | Horizons | Education

Kids Count report: Washington state ranks high on health insurance, low on high-school graduation

In children’s health, Washington stands above almost every other state. But high-school graduation rates and low enrollment in preschool continue to drag down the overall status of kids here, according to an annual ranking.
The Seattle Times, June 13, 2017

Is online ed missing the mark?

As online education proliferates, is it effective for those students who are already at risk because they may not have been well prepared for higher education in the first place? According to a new study from the Brookings Institution, students who are the least well prepared for traditional college also fare the worst in online courses. For top students, taking an online course didn’t definitively have a negative effect on a student’s grade point average. But for others — especially lower-performing students — taking online courses was associated with higher dropout rates and lower grades, both at the time the course was taken and in future semesters, when compared to students who took classes in person.
Inside Higher Ed, June 12, 2017

Yelp for colleges? An economist rates its usefulness

What if there were a consumer-based, Yelp-like ratings system for colleges? A study by Jonathan T. Rothwell, a visiting scholar at the George Washington University Institute of Public Policy, has found that asking alumni about their college experiences can be an accurate indicator of the overall quality of an institution.
The Chronicle of Higher Education, June 12, 2017

Long-simmering discord led to The Evergreen State College’s viral moment

At The Evergreen State College, students have disrupted events, charged the school with racism and listed demands ever since the academic year began. Protests finally exploded in late May when students took over an administration building and an anonymous threat shut down the campus.
The Seattle Times, June 10, 2017

Guidance on noting misconduct on transcripts

A panel of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers has released guidance to its members on how to include disciplinary notations on transcripts of students who are seeking to transfer to other institutions. ... The guidance suggests that there are ways to note "serious behavioral misconduct" on transcripts or in letters or other accompanying documents.
Inside Higher Ed, June 9, 2017

Healthy job market awaits 2017 grads, but job-hunt skills are still necessary

Career advisers at state colleges expect job-placement rates to remain steady. The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) expects across the country employers to hire 5 percent more graduates from the class of 2017 than the previous year. In particular, students graduating with science, technology, engineering or math majors will see high job and high earning potential.
The Seattle Times, June 8, 2017

Politics | Local, State, National

Another appeals court rejects Trump’s travel ban

A second federal appeals court ruled Monday against President Trump’s travel ban, upholding an injunction imposed by a lower court. The Trump administration has asked the Supreme Court to rule on the president’s executive order banning entry into the U.S. for nationals of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, which Trump argues is necessary to prevent the entry of terrorists. Critics of the ban see it as a pretext for banning the entry of Muslims, a step Trump called for in his campaign.
Inside Higher Ed, June 13, 2017

Group sues Ed over release of Title IX documents

The National Women's Law Center filed a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the Department of Education Monday alleging that it has improperly withheld documents concerning its enforcement of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.
Inside Higher Ed, June 13, 2017

Education advocates fear McCleary compromise won’t go far enough

As a handful of state lawmakers toil away in closed-door talks over how to fulfill court-ordered school funding, some education advocates fear that an eventual compromise won’t put enough money into the schools. The state Supreme Court in its 2012 McCleary decision ruled that Washington violates its own constitution by underfunding K-12 schools. Since then, lawmakers have poured billions of dollars into education to comply with McCleary, but delayed the hardest part until this year — figuring out how the state will cover teacher and other school-worker salaries.
The Seattle Times, June 12, 2017

Opinion: What Washington can learn from Oregon on K-12 spending

Five years after the state Supreme Court’s ruling on the McCleary lawsuit, Washington lawmakers are still tangled up in debates about arcane funding formulas and revenue patches. They have made so little progress that school funding advocates held a candlelight vigil earlier this month. But during Washington’s post-McCleary stagnation, Oregon — a neighbor and competitor for talent — has not stood still.
The Seattle Times, June 12, 2017

Bipartisan bill on competency-based education

A bipartisan bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives last week would create a demonstration project for competency-based education programs. The project would grant statutory and regulatory flexibility to participants, such as in the application of federal financial aid rules, while also creating new requirements aimed at accountability and transparency.
Inside Higher Ed, June 12, 2017

Free community college passes in Nevada

Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval signed into law the Nevada Promise Scholarship last week, which would effectively provide tuition-free community college to eligible students. The $3.5 million scholarship program would be available to graduating high school seniors after they have applied and taken advantage of other federal and state financial aid.
Inside Higher Ed, June 12, 2017

Education advocates fear McCleary compromise won’t go far enough

As a handful of state lawmakers toil away in closed-door talks over how to fulfill court-ordered school funding, some education advocates fear that an eventual compromise won’t put enough money into the schools. The state Supreme Court in its 2012 McCleary decision ruled that Washington violates its own constitution by underfunding K-12 schools. Since then, lawmakers have poured billions of dollars into education to comply with McCleary, but delayed the hardest part until this year — figuring out how the state will cover teacher and other school-worker salaries.
The Seattle Times, June 12, 2017

Do DeVos comments encourage anti-gay bias?

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos last month told lawmakers at a congressional hearing that states and local communities were better equipped than the federal government to deal with issues of regulation, drawing condemnations and negative headlines. In front of a Senate subcommittee last week, she had noticeably changed her tune, telling senators repeatedly that any school receiving federal funding is required to follow federal law.
Inside Higher Ed, June 12, 2017

Why a $67 million fine isn't motivating the Legislature to act

Washington state now has racked up $67 million in daily fines over lawmakers' failure to fully fund public schools. That big-dollar figure hasn’t proven much of a motivator so far. Right now, the Legislature is trudging through a second special session, still unable to agree on a new two-year budget that fixes how the state pays for K-12 education.
The News Tribune, June 11, 2017

Opinion: On school funding, first do no harm

Five years after the state Supreme Court issued its ruling in the McCleary case, we face the 2018 deadline they established for ample school funding. ... Given this looming deadline, one might assume this legislative session would be all about providing funding for the new allocation model, but significant changes are being considered. One major change proposed by the House and Senate is elimination of the “Salary Allocation Model” or SAM, which has worked well for decades.
The Seattle Times, June 11, 2017

Opinion: Lawmakers should stop partisanship and solve McCleary

Washington state government will shut down on July 1 if the Legislature doesn’t pass a state budget. More important, the Legislature must create a once-in-a-lifetime solution to the state’s unconstitutional school funding system, which perpetuates education inequity around the state.
The Seattle Times, June 9, 2017

Opinion: Invest in a high-quality education for every child from cradle to career

Over the past five years, more than 400,000 children have entered Washington’s K-12 system. During that same time frame, the Washington state Legislature has struggled to discern the best paths toward fulfilling its “paramount duty” to amply fund basic education. While much of the public dialogue has focused on current K-12 costs, there is a parallel conversation occurring related to the higher, long-term costs for our entire state of not investing in a high-quality education for every child — from cradle to career.
The Seattle Times, June 9, 2017

For students going overseas, an ‘America First’ presidency complicates their studies

Higher education has been focused on the potential impact of President Trump’s policies on international students ever since he announced a ban on travelers, including student-visa holders, from a half-dozen predominantly Muslim countries. But educators have also been focused, albeit more quietly, on the effects of the current political climate on American students going overseas.
The Chronicle of Higher Education, June 9, 2017

Falwell higher ed task force won’t happen

In the months since Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. said in January that he would be leading a presidential task force on higher education, the announcement went unacknowledged by the White House and the Department of Education, and few details have been forthcoming. Now it appears that a Falwell-led task force won’t be materializing at all.
Inside Higher Ed, June 9, 2017

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