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SBCTC Strategic Plan Goals and Strategies

Our Goals

SBCTC's strategic plan calls upon our community and technical college system to achieve three goals, founded on our vision for educational equity.

  1. Achieve educational equity for students who are historically underrepresented in higher education.
    • Eliminate inequities in college access, retention and completion for students historically underserved in higher education: Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native, Pacific Islander, Black/African American and Asian.
    • Eliminate inequities in wages and university transfers. Our colleges offer a wide range of credentials. Generally, the longer the credential, the higher the wages upon graduation. We want to see students of color equally represented in degree programs that either result in sought-after skills and higher wages or successful transfer into a university.
  2. Improve completion rates for all enrolled students across all types of programs and credentials — workforce degrees, transfer degrees, certificates and apprenticeships.
  3. Increase access and retention among populations who can benefit the most from college access. This includes young adults, working adults, low-income people, people of color, immigrants and single parents.

We aim to improve completion rates across-the-board for all students, and to improve completion rates faster for students of color.

Our Strategies

  • Strategy 1: Implement actions, policies and investments that produce equitable outcomes.
  • Strategy 2: Implement research-based strategies that are proven to improve completion rates for all students. These strategies include Guided Pathways and Career Launch programs. 
  • Strategy 3: Enroll more diverse students of all ages and backgrounds in our colleges, increasing their access to higher levels of education, higher salaries and greater financial security. 
  • Strategy 4: Strengthen advocacy and community partnerships. 
  • Strategy 5: Improve the college system’s long-term financial sustainability and infrastructure. 

 Strategy 1: Implement actions, policies and investments that produce equitable outcomes.

  • Using the new vision statement, engage college system leaders in equity-based professional development, advocacy and actions across the college system.
  • Develop a ladder of professional development opportunities that lead to leadership positions. Cultivate future, equity-minded leaders with faculty and staff at all levels, from frontline staff to aspiring mid- and senior-level college administrators.
  • Conduct policy audits to eliminate barriers for students in the key areas that can make or break their ability to enroll, and stay, in college. Examples include admissions, financial aid, precollege education and basic skills instruction.
  • Create an equity resource bank of best practices in the areas of student services, curricula, hiring and employment to share successful practices throughout the system.
  • Implement accessible technology for students, faculty and staff.
Strategy 2: Implement research-based strategies that are proven to improve completion rates for all students. These strategies include Guided Pathways and Career Launch programs.

Guided Pathways involves fundamentally redesigning the college experience for all students — from advising and support services to course sequencing and program maps. Advisers help students choose a path, stay on the path and get a degree or certificate. This work is especially important for students of color, low-income students, and those who are the first in their families to go to college. Guided Pathways is a way to make sure that students who enter our college system receive the proper supports that guide them, in a structured manner, through to completion.

  • Develop new partnerships with industry associations and labor organizations to ensure pathways align to the skills required by employers, thus helping to close the skills gap.
  • Ensure that every career pathway — health care, for example — reflects the full range of available credentials, including certificates, workforce degrees, university-transfer degrees, applied bachelor’s degrees and apprenticeships. This enables students to see the broad horizon of professional opportunities in the field and how credentials align with certain careers.
  • Embed equity strategies throughout the implementation of Guided Pathways.
  • Expand technical assistance to colleges on Guided Pathways.
  • Expand partnerships with private foundations and research organizations to scale Guided Pathways across all 34 colleges and evaluate outcomes.
  • Identify accountability metrics for college implementation focused on increasing student completions across student demographics.

Career Launch is part of Governor Inslee’s Career Connect Washington Initiative. Career Launch programs prepare young adults for careers by combining paid, real-life job experience with classroom studies.

  • Increase the number of students who engage in work-based learning as part of their college program.
  • Expand technical assistance to colleges implementing Career Launch programs.
  • Develop new partnerships with industry associations and labor organizations to expand Career Launch programs, especially in fields where employers are facing skill gaps.
Strategy 3: Enroll more diverse students of all ages and backgrounds in our colleges, increasing their access to higher levels of education, higher salaries and greater financial security.
  • Implement the college system’s strategic enrollment plan.
  • Increase participation in dual-credit programs for all students but especially students of color, including technical education dual-credit programs.
  • Help more low-income Washingtonians — those straight out of high school as well as low-wage working adults — complete financial aid applications for the new Washington College Grant.
  • Transition more basic skills students into college-level programs, with full and strategic use of state and federal financial aid.
Strategy 4: Strengthen advocacy and community partnerships.
  • Hold the 2019 vision statement at the core of the college system’s advocacy work.
  • Continue to build upon, and implement, the system’s strategic advocacy and messaging plan.
  • Continue to engage more people within our college system in advocacy and outreach efforts, including State Board members, trustees, presidents, faculty, and student leaders.
  • Create wider partnerships and alliances with the organizations and people we serve: communities of color, business associations, labor organizations, K-12 schools, and universities. These connections will help ensure we respond to the emerging needs of our students and the employers who hire them.
  • Build and strengthen relations with other government agencies, the Legislature, and the Governor’s Office.
Strategy 5: Improve the college system’s long-term financial sustainability and infrastructure. 
  • Build, remodel, and renovate facilities to support teaching and learning spaces that are high quality and technologically equipped.
  • Identify funding strategies and potential fund sources to do bigger and better things for our students and the economy, including expanding programs and services and providing competitive compensation.
  • Establish financial health and stability indicators and recommend professional development for new

Page Manager: shagreen@sbctc.edu
Last Modified: 9/9/20 8:49 AM

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